Tips for great sleep

From Alcohol to Aerobics

ResMed SDB

When sleep goes wrong, it can pose serious risks for our health and wellbeing. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is the umbrella term for a variety of different nocturnal breathing disorders, including central sleep apnoea (CSA), obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and Cheyne-Stokes Respiration (CSR). Here’s a quick primer on the types, the risks, and the treatment. What […]

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OSA

Obstructive Sleep Apnoea – OSA – is a condition that affects the health of millions of people around the world, but many of us don’t even realise we are living with it. According to the World Health Organisation, over 100 million adults suffer from obstructive sleep apnoea,(1) including one in three men and almost one in five women.(2) If you […]

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Stop all technological activity 60 minutes before lights-out time! Set a timer to keep you on track or enlist a member of the house to help you remember to turn off the TV, laptop and put the phone down![1] If you know you need to have an emotional conversation, or if you notice that you […]

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Sleep and sex

Sex and Sleep There are lots of jokes based on the idea that women want to cuddle after sex but men just fall asleep. So much for the comedy, what’s the reality? Does sex help you sleep? And if so, what’s the science behind it? Sex sets off a storm of hormonal reactions in the […]

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How much sleep is enough? For anyone interested in sleep, this is the most common and essential question. The truth is, when it comes to sleep duration there is no single number that is right for everyone.

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An even balance of REM, deep and light sleep is most likely within the healthy range, provided you are getting enough sleep in total and feel rested throughout the day. Memory consolidation happens in all stages of sleep to a degree, so you’re covered.

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However good that first cup of morning coffee tastes, the feeling that comes from drinking coffee can be even more enticing. Caffeine is a stimulant with powerful physical and mental effects.

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Routines and rituals help to relax and train your body and mind. You’ve likely experienced this in your daily life: an exercise routine is often easier to stick to when it’s done regularly at the same time.

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The symptoms of insomnia include issues that interfere with both sleep quality and sleep quantity. Not everyone with insomnia experiences all of these symptoms at once or even at all.

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Pain affects all of us at some point in our lives. Sometimes it’s an occasional bout of pain – sore muscles from an injury, the discomfort of a headache – and other times pain is more chronic or recurring.

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Feeling better after less sleep – including after getting less Deep or REM sleep – could be the result of your body trying to compensate for sleep deprivation. When you’re short on sleep, your body releases stress hormones the next day and evening.

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When it comes to sleep, we’re doing it wrong. At least, that’s the contention of some historians and sleep researchers who suggest that bedding down for seven to eight consecutive hours of rest is unnatural. Their argument – and its supporting evidence – is compelling. Drawn from historical records and clinical trials, a new picture […]

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If you had to choose, would you say that you are more of a morning or an evening type?
Partially driven by genetics, your tendency to be active in the morning or evening will have a big impact on when you are most alert, productive and creative, and on how you (and your significant other) sleep.

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In order to sleep, your internal organs each need to do different things like secrete melatonin, dial down the digestive system, and slow down breathing. On top of that, you need different organs to secrete growth hormones to repair body tissues.

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If you don’t effortlessly fall into a blissful slumber when you’re away from home, you’re not alone. Most people have difficulty sleeping in a new or unfamiliar place, even if it’s a luxury hotel.

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Driving while sleepy is an all-too-common and very dangerous problem. If you watch for the warning signs of driver fatigue and follow tips to stay alert, you’ll decrease your chances of being one of them.

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For a long time, scientists (and the rest of us) thought of the brain as a master command centre. It would send out signals to the body saying “okay lungs: inhale, then exhale.” Or “okay body, you’ve been awake for 16 hours, it’s time to sleep.” And from a big-picture level, that made sense.

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Did you know that sleep is one of the foundations of health and wellness? Sleep has a strong impact on your health, ability to fight disease, heal, and grow. Did you know that sleep is one of the foundations of health and wellness? Sleep has a strong impact on your health, ability to fight disease, heal, and grow.

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Sleep is a critical component of lifelong health and well-being, as important as diet and exercise. The effects of sleep on overall health are both broad and deep: regular, high-quality sleep lowers risk for illness and disease, particularly conditions that become more common with age.

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To anyone who’s flown before, the answer to this question is something of a no-brainer. Under the influence of jet lag, your mind and body drift in and out of a haze – a haze sometimes held at bay with stimulants like caffeine – and when it finally comes time to sleep, you crash hard.

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Watching competitive athletes at play – whether it’s Wimbledon, the World Cup, or the Super Bowl – do you ever wonder how these athletes prepare to perform at their best?

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Not only does it take a very visible toll on woman’s bodies but also it kills their sleep. According to the National Sleep Foundation, 78% of women develop insomnia when they are expecting. And that’s just the beginning.

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Sleeping with company isn’t always as peaceful and restful as we’d like it to be. Partners, kids and pets can interfere with sound sleep.

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Increasingly, science is deepening our understanding about the differences in sleep for men and for women. Adult men and women have the same essential need for sleep – nearly all healthy adults require between seven to nine hours a night to feel rested and function at their best.

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You can take steps before, during, and after your flight to minimize disruptions to your sleep cycle, mood and well-being. Managing your sleep as you move through time zones can help make travel more enjoyable and productive.

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Did you know that an erratic bedtime schedule could lead you to experiencing “jet lag” without ever leaving home? When I was in college, I was guilty of going to bed later and later each night as the week wore on. In the beginning of the week I was asleep by midnight, but by the end of the week, I was turning off the lights at 4 a.m.

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A comfortable sleep environment makes a big difference to sleep. A clean room, a sense of order, fresh bedding and a dark sleeping space can all create a sense of calm and of comfort, making your bedroom an inviting place to be, a place that’s conducive to high quality rest.

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REM, like all other stages of sleep, is a biological necessity. When we don’t get enough REM, our brain will compensate by promoting REM whenever possible. This is called REM rebound.

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Each night the body goes through several different phases: Light Sleep, Deep Sleep, REM sleep, and Wakefulness.
Over the course of an eight-hour night of sleep, these sleep phases repeat within 4 to 5 cycles between bedtime and morning.

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All the stages of sleep are important to physical health and well-being. In discussions of sleep, there is a great emphasis placed on the phases of deep sleep and REM sleep, so much so that it can be easy to overlook the value of light sleep.

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Deep sleep is a lot like your weight; it’s one part of a whole recipe for living. If you focus too much on what your “Time in Deep” is – at the expense of the whole picture of your sleep architecture, circadian rhythm, your sleep schedule, and how you feel during the day – you’re going to miss out.

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Exercise is deeply beneficial to sleep. And you don’t have to run marathons or scale mountains to receive those benefits. Any amount of exercise can have a positive effect on your nightly rest.

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It’s no accident that we spend a third of our lives asleep. Like the rest of the animal kingdom, we humans need sleep for our overall health and well being. Restorative sleep is particularly important during our nights of sleep.

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Together with exercise, diet and sleep create the foundation for long-term health and well-being. A healthy diet confers can enhance sleep quality and sleep duration. And getting regular, high-quality sleep can actually help you eat better.

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Sleep does wonders for us, both inside and out. If you can imagine, sleep does even more than helping you to feel rested, protecting your health and immune system, improving your cognitive function, your memory and your athletic performance.

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Be honest: How many times have you had that extra drink at night or that soda in the afternoon?
Didn’t get that walk in like you said you would? Suffered though a night of pain instead of talking with your doctor to help find a solution?

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Stress is a part of life for all of us. There are stressors that occur in our everyday lives, worries and concerns that often relate to families and relationships, to work and finances.

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Exercise is one of the most effective ways to improve sleep. If you’re having trouble sleeping and exercise isn’t part of your daily routine, it may be time to get moving!

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Although alcohol sometimes helps to induce sleep, drinking alcohol actually prevents you from getting a full night’s rest. The effects of alcohol last longer than you might think.

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* ResMed recorded and analysed 2,000,000 nights of sleep in the development of S+

** Users with average sleep scores between 50-60 improved their sleep by an average of 44.71 minutes per night after one week of use.

*** Below average users are those with an average sleep score below 75. Poor sleep is defined as an average sleep score between 50-60. Very poor sleep is defined as an average sleep score between 30-50. Users with average sleep scores between 30-50 improved their sleep by more than 70 minutes per night after one week of use. Aggregate S+ user data as of 03/19/2015. All data is derived from a sample size of [5932] users as of 03/19/2015. Your results may be different.

Note: S+ is not a medical device. If you are seeking information on how to treat a sleep disorder, you should talk to your healthcare provider.